SOME ENGLISH WORDS YOU USE WRONGLY (SEE WHY)

0
313

SOME ENGLISH WORDS YOU USE WRONGLY (SEE WHY) – ZIGIHOW.COM.NG

English is said to be a west Germanic language, that was first spoken in Anglo-Saxon England in the early middle ages.

English has been spoken for many centuries and today English language has become an international language spoken in almost all the countries all over the world.

Research has it that there are so many English words that are been used incorrectly all over the world, most of us uses this English words incorrectly and don’t even know about it till date.

There may be regional variation in grama, spelling, and word-use, especially between different English-speaking countries.

Such differences aren’t seen as incorrect, once they have gained general acceptance in a particular country.

Some of the English words we use incorrectly actually means the opposite of what we thought they mean to us, but they actually sound alike.

In this very article we’re going to see some of this English words we use incorrectly and possibly take corrections.

1. Dupe (Verb or Noun)

The way we actually use the noun form of this word is the problem.

A person who dupes is not someone who cheats, deceives, defraud, or tricks people.

A dupe is someone who has fallen a victim of deception, someone who has been tricked, deceived or defrauded.

Examples:

i. She was acting smart untill she became the dupe.

ii. When the man realized he was duped he went uncontrollably.

2. Bogus (adjective)

This very word does not mean anything big, large, massive, or anything relating to size.

It actually means “Not true or Genuine” “illegal” “Counterfeit” “Fake” “False” “Misleading” “Sham” “Spurious” etc.

Examples:

i. The lawyer issued some bogus documents to backup his claims, but could not eventually defend himself at the end.

ii. I did not pay him because the product he sells was bogus.

3. Double date (noun)/double-date(verb)

Many people actually thought that real meaning of this words is when “Someone has more than one lover/date partner” that’s totally wrong.

The actual meaning of this word is “A situation whereby two couples or date partners goes out on a date with another two couples or date partners”

Eg: Your friend and his/her love partner together with you and your love partner going out on a date together.

Examples:

i. Gabriel and Kate are coming over to the bar, so it’s a double-date.

ii. We have been friends with them for several years, we’ve even been dating since college.

4. Terrific (adjective)

This word is not actually a synonym for the word “Terrible” or “Terrifying”.
The actual meaning of this word is “Great” “very good” “huge” “Tremendous” “Massive” “Gigantic” “Colossal” “Mighty” ” Prodigious” “Formidable” etc.

Examples:

i. I had this terrific feeling during the exams

ii. The football players had a terrific performance today.

 

5. Restive (adjective)

Some people thinks the meaning of this word is anything that has to do with “resting”, if you’re among those people then you’re absolutely wrong.

The actual meaning of this word is the complete opposite.

When someone is said to be restive, it means him or her is “Unable to stay calm or still” or “Unwilling to be controlled”

Examples:

i. He was so hurt he became restive throughout the party.

ii. Let’s calm the restive once before the issue escalates beyond control.

 

6. Talkative (adjective)

Sincerely speaking, I have been using this word incorrectly.

The word “talkative” isn’t a noun so it’s totally wrong to actually say “Jane is a talkative”.

It is an adjective which means “Fond of talking alot”.

Examples:

i. I’ve known Jane for a long time now, she’s not very talkative.

ii. I was so in a talkative mood the last time we met.

7. Blood Money (Noun)

People actually believes that the meaning of this word is “A money received from rituals after murdering someone” this is totally wrong.

This word actually means “Money paid to assassins to kill someone” or ” money paid to someone who provided information about a killer”

Examples:

i. Courtney received the blood money from the government.

ii. The family of the deceased received blood money from the government.

 

8. Impeach (verb)

This word is popularly used in political climate and in public service.

For example in US, to impeach someone means “To charge a public office holder to court for a serious crime” such as fraud.

While in British English it means “To charge someone to court for treason or Another heavy crime against the state or government.

However it doesn’t really mean the person charged has been removed from office.

The word “impeach” can also mean “To question the validity of a practice”

Examples:

i. Think the senators should impeach the immunity

ii. The head of department was impeached for not supporting the fight against corruption.

 

9. Lousy (adjective)

This word is often thought to mean “Loud” or “Noisy” No!! Totally wrong.

It actually means”Very bad” “very poor” unpleasant” etc

Examples:

i. I had a lousy weekend

ii. The principal is such a lousy person.

 

10. Borrow (verb)

The meaning of this word still remains unclear to some people.

The word Borrow actually means “to take or receive something from someone and it is expected to be returned”.

Examples:

i. He borrowed my play station (PES) but won’t return it – isn’t it unfair?

ii. Hello, please can I borrow some money from you?

 

11. Lend (verb)

We actually mix this word with “borrow”.

Lend means “to give out something to someone Which is expected to be returned”

Now understand this, the word “Borrow” and “Lend” are reciprocal pairs just like Give/take, Teach/learn, Open/close, etc that actually shows both sides of a situation.

Examples:

i. I can’t lend you more money

ii. He begged me to lend him my jacket after he borrowed my play station (PES)

NOTE: Don’t forget borrow “Comes in” Lend “Goes out” .

You lend someone something by giving it to them.

They borrow it by talking it from you.

[JOIN US ON TELEGRAM!!!]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here